• Concerns are growing about young men choosing to access to violent pornography
  • NSW Police Assistant Commissioner Mark Murdoch warned this was linked to more violent sexual crimes
  • White Ribbon CEO Libby Davies said the group’s research found more men were searching for violent porn
  • Ms Davies said this was affecting young people’s ability to form normal relationships

Police are concerned the easy access to violent online pornography is directly linked to the types of sexual assaults being committed by young men.

‘I believe the impact of porn and young men’s access to it and the rise in sexual violence are related’, NSW Assistant Commissioner Mark Mudoch told Daily Mail Australia. 

Mr Murdoch also said consumption of these aggressive forms of pornography, which in no way reflect real life, is having an adverse impact and ‘influence on respectful relationships’.

White Ribbon, a group which works stop violence towards women, told Daily Mail Australia research suggested more young males were searching for violent pornography.

‘What we understand from research of pornographic sites and porn is that there is an increasing demand for more violent types of pornography’, CEO Libby Davies said.

She also revealed that research, conducted over the past four years, shows a concerning increase in the ‘expectation of young men is that sexual relationships are based on a level of violence.’

Mr Murdoch relayed a recent incident where a sexually active teenage couple aged just 16 were completely unaware of the concept on consent.

The boy would apparently have sex with his girlfriend without her consent, but neither party believed this to be a crime.

‘I nearly had an argument with the researcher’, Mr Murdoch revealed. ‘I couldn’t believe it.’ 

White Ribbon CEO Libby Davies said more young men are searching for violent porn

‘This is what some people believe is a normal relationship.’

Mr Murdoch added that he ‘certainly’ supports the idea that greater education about pornography is needed to prevent this concerning trend, but pointed out the responsibility does not rely solely on schools to do this.

‘There’s a big role for the parents in all of this.

‘As a community it’s a problem that needs to be addressed’, Mr Murdoch said.

Ms Davies said they are currently trying to educate young people about the perils of social media and some of the things they may be exposed to while online.

‘What is sometimes portrayed as normal behaviour is actually abhorrent behaviour’, she said.

Mr Murdoch agreed that action needed to be taken so that violent behaviours do not develop into more serious ones.

‘If it’s let go these young men can end up being perpetrators of violent sexual crimes’, he warned. 

 

 

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